VOA NEWS

August 7, 2017

From Washington, this is VOA news.



An uncharacteristic silence from North Korea after Saturday's unanimous vote by the U.N. Security Council.

The Council voted 15 to nothing on Saturday for a resolution written by the United States that will deprive North Korea, that is, of a billion dollars a year in revenue that helps fund its nuclear and ballistic missile program. That's a third of what the country produces in exports every year.

U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley spoke about the sanctions. "I want to personally thank the Chinese delegation for the important contributions they made to this resolution.

While the Security Council has done good work, the members of the Security Council, and all U.N. member states, must do more to increase the pressure on North Korea."

The resolution to place added sanctions on North Korea is in response to the rogue nation's intercontinental ballistic missile launches on July 3 and 28.

The tests show that North Korea may now have the capacity to reach the American mainland and much of Europe with its missiles.



China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi held a meeting with his North Korean counterpart, Ri Yong Ho, Sunday at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations meeting in Manila.

Wang said he urged Ri to adhere to U.N. resolutions and stop provoking the international community's good-will with missile launches and nuclear tests.

A warning to North Korea by foreign ministers from the 10 ASEAN countries is expected to soothe the U.S. government, which the ministers hope will play a stronger role in their region.



You're listening to news from the Voice of America in Washington.



Authorities in Nigeria said 11 people were killed and 18 others critically wounded in an attack on a church in the southeastern part of the country.

Initially witnesses said the attack was carried out by at least two gunmen, but the police commissioner said one gunman attacked St. Philip Catholic Church early Sunday.

The Anambra state governor, Willie Obiano, said the attack stemmed from a feud between members of the local community who were living outside Nigeria.

No group has claimed responsibility for the attack, but police said they do not believe Boko Haram militants were behind it.



Kenya's Rift Valley was the epicenter of the 2007-2008 post-election violence. While there are few concerns of mounting tensions this year over the ongoing local races, residents have held youth marches and a special church service to remember the victims of the 2008 Kiambaa church massacre.

As Mohammed Yusuf reports from Eldoret, voters go to the polls on Tuesday to elect a new president.

In 2007, a disputed presidential vote, communities turned against each other. More than 1,000 people died and 600,000 people were displaced.

Since the post-election violence, many things have changed. The two warring communities have reconciled and now support one candidate for the presidency, the incumbent, Uhuru Kenyatta, and his deputy William Ruto.

In this election that unity will be tested as local races and politics take center stage.

The International Crisis Group has warned of possible violence, saying the creation of new counties ruled by powerful elected local officials has increased the stakes the political competition.

ICG notes the task of reconciling the two communities is not yet complete, and unresolved historical grievances explain the tension that comes with election violence in Rift Valley region.

Mohammed Yusuf, for VOA news, Eldoret, Kenya.



Venezuelan military leaders say they quickly put down an attack on a base in central Venezuela Sunday. President Nicholás Maduro called it an act of terrorism by rebellious former soldiers.

The president said two of the attackers were killed.

An army officer posted a video on social media in which he was surrounded by more than a dozen soldiers. He declared himself to be in "legitimate rebellion" against what he called Maduro's "murderous tyranny."

He said, "This is not a coup. This is a civilian and military action to restore the constitutional order and to save the country from total destruction."



There is more on these and other late breaking and developing stories, from around the world, around the clock, at voanews.com. I'm Jonathan Smith in Washington.

That's the latest world news from VO(A).