VOA NEWS

July 7, 2017

From Washington, this is VOA news. I'm Jonathan Smith reporting.



Dozens of people were hurt as German police and anti-capitalist demonstrators clashed Thursday in Hamburg during a march protesting the upcoming Group of 20 summit.

After the rousing welcome he got in Poland, President Trump arrived in less friendly territory to face tough issues of trade and climate, as well as his first face-to-face meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Protesters had been camping out since the start of the week, waiting for the U.S. leader.

Thousands of people took part in the protests against the G-20 economic summit, which will be held Friday and Saturday.

Trump met with German Chancellor Angela Merkel Thursday afternoon as thousands of protesters gathered in the historic Hamburg Fish Market and confronted police, some tossing bottles.

Nearly 75 police officers were injured throughout the evening. Three required treatment at a hospital. The pilots of a police helicopter sustained eye injuries when laser pointers were directed at them.



At least 28 inmates have been killed in a fight between rival gangs at a state prison in the Mexican Pacific resort of Acapulco.

The Guerrero state security spokesman said at least three inmates were also injured in the fighting that broke out around 4:00 a.m. local time.

(The) spokeswoman said the incident began because of the constant dispute between rival groups inside the prison.

Security officials were able to regain control of the facility later in the day.

Guerrero has been one of Mexico's most violent states. The once glamorous resort of Acapulco has struggled to deal with a high number of killings.



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Several hundred Islamic State fighters are still clinging to control of a small part of the city of Mosul in Iraq, but Iraqi commanders and U.N. officials said Thursday that thousands of civilians are trapped there in extreme danger from the fighting [ranging] raging around them.

ISIS militants have pressed their family members into the fight for Mosul, now in its final stages, and Iraqi commanders said the extremists have threatened to blow up any civilian(s) who try to flee to safety.



The International Criminal Court says South Africa violated its obligations to the ICC by not arresting Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, who is wanted on genocide charges. We get more on that from VOA's Anita Powell.

Two years after Omar al-Bashir's whirlwind visit to South Africa, judges at the International Criminal Court unanimously ruled the nation's officials erred by failing to arrest Sudan's president on an international war crimes warrant.

The court issued a warrant in 2009 for the Sudanese leader on charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity for his involvement in the long-running conflict in Darfur, where the United Nations estimates 300,000 people have been killed and more than two million have been displaced.

Other African nations and the African Union have frequently accused the court of targeting Africans. The court disputes this charge and notes it is investigating situations in a number of countries, but has yet to try a case from a non-African nation.

Anita Powell, VOA news, Johannesburg.



A DRC military court handed out long prison terms to eight Congolese soldiers for killing civilians during violence in Kasai province last year.

Two of the soldiers got 20 years behind bars while three others were given 15-year sentences. Two soldiers who had escaped custody were sentenced to life in prison. Others were given lesser terms.

Video emerged earlier this year of the soldiers firing at unarmed civilians suspected to be militia members. The video showed the troops walking among at least 20 corpses lying in the streets.



The U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Thursday pledged to usher in a "new era" of American leadership in space. He spoke at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

He told about 800 cheering NASA employees, space experts and private contractors "Our nation will return to the Moon, and we will put American boots on the face of Mars." He did not any specifics.

(The) pledge comes almost a week after the National Space Council was reinstated after being dormant for nearly 25 years.



There is more on these and other stories from around the world around the clock at voanews.com. I'm Jonathan Smith in Washington.

That's the latest world news from VOA.