VOA NEWS

June 7, 2017

From Washington, this is VOA news. I'm Steve Miller reporting.



The French counter-terrorism office has launched an investigation into an attack on a Paris police officer Tuesday at the Notre Dame.

The Paris police prefect, Michel Cadot, spoke to reporters on Tuesday providing a summary of events.

There was a patrol of three police officers who were in charge of security, in particular, the tourists who were around Notre Dame when a person went behind these police officers armed with a hammer and started to hit a police officer.

So his colleague reacted with self-control and pulled out his gun immediately and shot so that the police officer attacked would not be hurt more seriously than what he could have suffered.

In this moment, this police officer was taken to the hospital.

The aggressor is being given treatment. He was injured and so we are waiting for the prognosis that will be communicated to us.

The suspect had an identification card indicating that he was from Algeria. He was also found to be armed with knives.

Paris remains under high security after several terrorist attacks in recent years.



British Prime Minister Theresa May said Londoners would not submit to terror.

"These are attacks on our way of life. The British people have shown their resilience and their defiance in the face of the terrorists. We will not allow our way of life to be damaged or endangered by the terrorists. And we will carry on with business as usual."

May is being forced to defend her past record as the country's interior minister and the political architect of Britain's counter-terrorism system.

May called this week's snap election anticipating a landslide victory but the recent terror attack is undermining the confidence May so carefully crafted as the country's home secretary.



This is VOA.



U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley warned that the Trump administration might pull out of the U.N. Human Rights Council. Lisa Schlein reports from Geneva.

Nikki Haley is the 29th U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and the first to address the U.N. Human Rights Council. Her tough, unequivocal message was not lost on the 47-member Council.

"I am grateful for the opportunity to speak in front of this body on an issue that we believe is very important - respect for human rights. As you know, the United States is looking carefully at this Council and our participation in it."

Haley criticized the Council for what she perceived to be a double standard applied to Israel. By way of example, she noted the Council had never adopted a resolution condemning Venezuela for its serious human rights violations.

"And yet it adopted five biased resolutions in March against a single country, Israel."

The U.S. ambassador said membership of the U.N. Council was an area open to reform.

Haley said "being a member of the Council is a privilege, and no country that is a human rights violator should be allowed a seat at the table."

Lisa Schlein, VOA news, Geneva.



U.S. State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said Tuesday that the U.S. relationship with Qatar is strong, but "We recognize that Qatar has made some great efforts to try to stop financing of terror groups, including prosecuting suspected financiers, freezing assets, and introducing stringent controls on its banking system there. However, let me make this clear: They have made progress. But they still have work to do. More work needs to be done."

Her comments come as President Donald Trump injected the United States into a volatile crisis among America's Mideast allies, siding with Saudi Arabia and other countries against Qatar in a dispute that threatens to disrupt efforts to defeat the Islamic State group and counter Iran.

In a series of early morning tweets, Trump appeared to endorse the accusation that the small gas-rich kingdom funds terrorist groups, a serious allegation against a strategic U.S. partner that hosts a base with some 10,000 American troops.



China's government on Tuesday rejected a U.S. State Department call to release three activists detained while investigating a factory that produced shoes for Ivanka Trump and other brands. It sought instead to enforce a cone of silence around the men, according to a lawyer and the wife one of the detainees who was also interrogated for hours.

The U.S. State Department on Monday called on China to release the men who were detained last week after working undercover in a Chinese factory to check into worker abuse.



In Washington, I'm Steve Miller.

That's the latest world news from VOA.